Good to Great and the Social Sectors.pdf

Good to Great and the Social Sectors PDF

Jim Collins

Building upon the concepts introduced in Good to Great, Jim Collins answers the most commonly asked questions raised by his readers in the social sectors. Using information gathered from interviews with over 100 social sector leaders, Jim Collins shows that his Level 5 Leader and other good-to-great principles can help social sector organizations make the leap to greatness.

For the social sectors, the first answers how greatness can be defined and pursued, the second helps show what extremely adept and effective leaders look like, the third helps show how to hire the right people, the fourth focuses on both on sustaining longevity and consistency, and the fifth talks about how to build momentum and create a bigger ...

1.39 MB Dosya boyutu
9780977326402 ISBN

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Güncel Notlar

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ACAR YALÇIN

The key thought is that greatness is not about luck or circumstance but is about choice and discipline. Local government can choose to be great, good, or average. Good to Great and the Social Sector allows them to choose great. It is a must-own for any local government manager. GOOD TO GREAT AND THE SOCIAL SECTORS 3 Social sector leaders have embraced this distinction-the principles of greatness, as distinct from the practices ofbusiness-with remark­ able case. If a nonbusiness reader is just as likely to email me as a business reader, thcn somewhere between 30% and 50% of those who have read Good to Great come from nonbusiness. We 've received

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KORKMAZ YAVUZ

About the Publisher. Good to great and the social sectors. Why Business Thinking Is Not the Answer. The critical distinction is not between business and social, but between great and good.

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DOĞAN KARA

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter. Good to great and the social sectors. I highly recommend this resource for school leaders who already have read Good to Great. ...answers the most commonly asked questions raised by his readers in the social sectors. Leader" and other good-to-great principles can help social sector organizations make the leap to greatness.

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ÖZTÜRK ÖZDEMİR

In business, money is bot h an input (a resource for achieving greatness) and an outp ut (a measure of greatness). In the social sectors, money is only an in put, and not a measure of great ness. A great o rganization is one that delivers superio r performance and makes ~1 … Good to Great and the Social Sectors By Lovett H. Weems, Jr. on February 28, 2007 Leading Ideas Lovett Weems draws church leadership lessons from Jim Collins’s book Good to Great and the Social Sectors, which itself draws lessons from the business world for the non-profit sector.

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ÇELİK YILDIRIM

Summary. Jim Collins, author of Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap and Other's Don't, discusses the challenges the social sector faces and his monograph, Good to Great and the Social Sector: Why Business Thinking Is Not the Answer. When GOOD TO GREAT: Why Some Companies Make the Leap … and Others Don’t was published by HarperBusiness in 2001 to international acclaim, both publisher and author Jim Collins were intrigued to discover that a significant number of the book’s path to greatness in the social sectors is to become “more like a business.” Most businesses—like most of anything else in life— fall somewhere between mediocre and good. Few are great. When you compare great companies with good ones, many widely practiced business norms turn out to correlate with mediocrity, not greatness.